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Mennonite Disaster Service sent more than 20 volunteers trained to work in disaster-stricken areas to begin cleanup following the tornadoes in Alabama. MDS disaster response coordinator and the region director arrived the day after the tornadoes left a 19-mile-long path of destruction. Once debris is removed, groups of MDS volunteers will follow to rebuild.—MDS release
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More than 2 million people benefitted from Canadian Foodgrains Bank programs in 2010. A total of $9.1 million was donated to the Foodgrains Bank, including 19,523 tonnes of food worth $4.8 million. Together with matching funds from Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the Foodgrains Bank provided $38 million of food, nutrition programs, and agricultural assistance to people in 35 countries. Almost 1 billion people still don’t have enough to eat. —foodgrainsbank.ca
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An endowment will establish Trinity Western University, Langley, B.C., as the North American centre for Septuagint studies. The family of late professor John William Wevers donated $400,000 to establish the John William Wevers Chair in Septuagint Studies. The gift represents the passing of the torch to Septuagint Institute director Dr. Rob Hiebert, Wever’s former student.—TWU release
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In its 90th year, Mennonite Weekly Review (MWR) will get a new name and new publication schedule. Mennonite Weekly Review will become Mennonite World Review, a biweekly, Apr. 2, 2012. The board of directors approved the revisioning plan and then announced the changes Mar. 25 at MWR Inc.’s annual corporation meeting. The new name reflects MWR’s ongoing purpose to “build unity among people of faith separated by distance and denominational labels.” Additionally, MWR editor Paul Schrag will succeed Robert M. Schrag, retiring after 51 years, as publisher Aug. 1. —mennoweekly.org 
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Shinji Takeda, former chair of the Japanese MB Conference and pastor of Mokogawa MB Church, is the new president of Osaka (Japan) Evangelical Biblical Seminary (EBS), following Dr. Takashi Manabe’s retirement after 20 years of leadership. Dr. Hironori Minamino, a graduate of MB Biblical Seminary, Fresno, is EBS’s new academic dean.—ICOMB release
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Former Mennonite World Conference president (1984–90) Ross T. Bender died Apr. 21 in Goshen, Ind. Bender also served as professor of Christian education at Goshen Biblical Seminary and Associated Mennonite Biblical Seminary over 34 years, and as director of the Institute of Mennonite Studies.—MWC release

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In a letter to the editor of Macleans, Evangelical Fellowship of Canada vice-president Don Hutchinson expressed his displeasure that, while people may pool Aeroplan benefits for the Red Cross efforts in Japan, evangelical causes working alongside the Red Cross, such as The Salvation Army, Compassion Canada, and World Vision, are disqualified from the the Aeroplan Charitable Pooling program on the basis of their religious affiliation. “Unlike Aeroplan’s broad and general disqualification of political, government or sports organizations, the only religious group prohibited by the program is Evangelicals,” writes Hutchinson.—EFC release
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Compassion Canada and Briercrest College and Seminary signed a partnership agreement Apr. 4, committing to work together in developing courses on holistic child development, and service and learning opportunities for students. “My prayer…is that every student…will be inculcated with the belief…that children matter,” says Compassion president Barry Slauenwhite. Compassion Canada works with some 5,000 churches in 26 nations to care for more than 1 million children and families.—Compassion Canada release
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Christian leaders in Israel are protesting the Israeli government’s denial of a residency permit to an Anglican bishop. The refusal prevents Suheil Dawani, a native of West Bank, from using the Anglican cathedral and diocesan offices in East Jerusalem. They are also protesting new taxes on church properties, saying they mark a “radical departure from the consistent practice of every previous State to have governed any part of the Holy Land.” Some prelates have been threatened with expulsion from Jerusalem if they do not withdraw their support from criticism of the new taxes.—Christian Courier 
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Shareholders of South Africa’s Competition Commission approved Wal-Mart’s proposal to acquire a 51 percent stake in the Johannesburg-based supermarket Massmart. If the Competition Authorities rule in favour of the $2.3 billion deal, Massmart will provide Wal-Mart with 290 stores in 13 African countries. South Africa’s unions oppose the deal because of Wal-Mart’s reputation for being anti-union, engaging in cost-cutting measures, and exploiting foreign employees.—Christian Courier
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Teen Challenge International founder David Wilkerson, author of The Cross and the Switchblade, died Apr. 27 in a car accident at 79. Wilkerson left Pennsylvania for New York in 1958, preaching to members of gangs and the drug trade. In the 1980s, he planted Times Square Church – today a congregation of more than 5,000. To those who visited his church to purse-snatch, Wilkerson said, “You came here thinking you’d leave with a few bucks, but you’ll leave knowing the life-changing love of God.”—WORLD magazine

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