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Abuse prevention

“The knowledge and understanding this booklet provides could spare so much grief in the church,” says Elsie Goerzen, program coordinator for MCC BC’s abuse response and prevention program. The newly updated booklet Understanding sexual abuse by a church leader or caregiver starts with the biblical text as its foundation and provides a clear definition of what constitutes sexual abuse by a church leader or caregiver. It includes a composite story of actual abuse experiences, gives tools to help individuals and groups understand some of the dynamics of sexual abuse, and provides a list of suggested resources for further study. Available for free from your local MCC office or as a download from abuse.mcc.org (under “Sexual Abuse Resources”).

Voice of the Martyrs
Persecution.net/download/prisonlst.pdf

In more than 50 nations declared “restricted” or “hostile” to Christians, believers are threatened, killed, or imprisoned for believing in Jesus. Voice of the Martyrs’ website offers addresses and guidelines for writing letters to imprisoned Christians around the world.—Angeline Schellenberg

Second Thoughts
kfwiebe.blogspot.com

Long-time Christian Leader columnist, feminist author, and octogenarian Katie Funk Wiebe explores what it’s like “to know that the number of years ahead is probably a fraction of what I have already enjoyed.” Funk’s writing celebrates those things that last: memories, family, grace, and the power of words. With a sense of humour and self-acceptance 87 years in the making, Funk inspires readers to “face the day running.”—Angeline Schellenberg

Although one in 11 Canadians lives in poverty, a Salvation Army report found 41 percent of Canadians believe poor people will “take advantage” of any assistance and nearly half feel if people really want to work, they can always find jobs. Only 65 percent of Canadians believe poverty can rob a person of dignity. To counteract the pervasive myths, The Salvation Army is launching the Dignity Project, using online events, on-the-street outreach, advertising, and social networking to engage Canadians on the challenges of poverty.salvationarmy.ca/dignity

A new Canadian resource endorsed by award-winning author Philip Yancey aims at facilitating communication between Christians and followers of other faiths. “Know Thy Neighbour” booklets are designed to “explore points of contact between Christianity and world religions and use them to build bridges across which the Gospel can travel,” says Matthew P. John, executive director of Focus Infinity Christian Outreach Network, the booklet’s creators. The 10 titles in the series will be available for subscribers on a quarterly basis starting Jan. 1, 2012.—focusinfinity.com

A weekly news analysis program Context with Lorna Dueck (Globe and Mail writer, and former host and executive producer of Listen Up TV) explores the question: “Can religion be trusted?” The show features instant audience-polling technology and high profile guests, including Islamic and Christian apologists, and journalists who track religious tensions. Context airs Sundays at 11:00 a.m. on Global and 9:30 a.m. on Vision.—Context release

For more than 30 years, the More-with-Less Cookbook has stirred the pot. Now Herald Press has updated their number 2 all-time bestselling title to reflect current eating habits, health issues, and Canada “Food Guide” recommendations. This third edition of More-with-Less will continue to invite global environmental and economic issues into North American kitchens for years to come.
—Herald Press

The Evangelical Fellowship of Canada’s (EFC) new report “Seeking Justice, Rescuing the Enslaved” presents a strategy on how to end human trafficking, offering recommendations on specific laws that the EFC wants amended with the goal of releasing victims and providing a future. New laws on human trafficking are one step closer after Bill C-310 was brought before the House of Commons Oct. 25. If it passes, Canadians and permanent residents found trafficking persons outside of Canada could be tried in Canadian courts.—Evangelical Fellowship of Canada, joysmith.ca

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