God’s work in a refugee camp

I have no nationality. I am just of Jesus Christ.

My name is Safari and I have been a refugee for more than 20 years…because God wanted me to be.

My tribe, the Tutsi, is not accepted in Congo. Many have been killed, including my family.

When they killed my father, I was in my bed. I saw how they killed him, I know who killed him and I thought I would be dead as well. By the grace of God, I survived.

I fled to a refugee camp in Rwanda.

After a time, I returned to Congo, but I was persecuted, so I went to Burundi.

I went back to Congo, but had to escape again. This was in 2007.

When I arrived in Malawi, God called me to serve him.

The camp is a small place with 27,000 people all crammed together. People die every day because of conflict.

But, in my time in Congo, the MB church taught me things I had taken in: forgiveness; that God lives in peace; that I need to love others in the same way God has loved me. So, I prayed and began to share the good news.

Starting with four people who received the message, we moved around in the camp preaching the good news, how you can be forgiven, how you can live together in peace. God gave me grace to be listened to.

We began to call ourselves “the Menno Group” because we speak about peace, repentance and love.

Safari shares his testimony with Doug Hiebert as translator at the ICOMB consultation. PHOTO: MB Mission

One day, there was news that a rebel had come to the camp. Many people knew what he had done in Congo, and they ran and hid.

I found the man all alone. I started to tremble. Here was the man in charge of the operation that killed my parents.

“My brother how you are you?” I said. “Do you remember me? I’m the son of the pastor. It’s you who killed my father.

“But, my brother,” I told him, “you are good. It’s not you that killed, it’s the thing that’s inside of you that is bad.

“Come to my house,” I invited. “It’s your time to receive Christ.”

He accepted.

For three years, he was in my house. Now he’s one of the pastors in our church.

Because of this testimony, the message of peace is now grounded – people see it has teeth.

God is using us, the church is continuing, people are accepting Jesus Christ.

In 2008, we got official government recognition as an MB church.

I have been teaching others by the grace of God; we now have 15 churches with more than 2,500 people. We do literacy work with women and Bible training to form servants of God. In the camp, people know this is a church that brings peace. I thank the Father that because of war people are accepting Jesus.

I have had opportunity to go to the West as a refugee, but I refused because my mission in Malawi is not finished. If these 27,000 people in the camp are transformed, they will transform the world.

God uses people who were not accepted to do his work. May all glory be to God.

[Adapted from the testimony of Safari Mutabesha, a church leader living in Malawi, at the ICOMB consultation in Thailand, Mar. 13, 2017.

4 Comments on “God’s work in a refugee camp

  1. I hope I can have a crumb of this man’s trust in God, if such danger and tribulation replaces my life of peace and prosperity.

    • All glory be to God, Thank you Brother Gerda for your comment about my testimony.
      God bless you.
      Love and prayer

  2. This testimony is beautiful and powerful.
    Thank you Safari for trusting in the Lord in difficult times and continuing to serve him; I pray for continued strength as you, and the church in Malawi, participate in the work that Christ is doing.

    • Thank you Brother Jordan for your prayer.
      Contunue to prayer for the ministry in Malawi , This April ,6 Muslims have accepted jesus Christ as Lord and serviour and 1former chef military from Burundi Has been Baptizing in our church last Saturday (22/04/2017) in Dzaleka refugee camp.
      All glory be to God

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Subscribe to MB Herald via email

Enter your email address to receive notification of new posts.

%d bloggers like this: