How do you practise everyday generosity?

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I try to practise the fruit of the Spirit in dealing with others, especially with my family. When my youngest says, “Mom, watch!” for the 100th time in a day, I try to be excited and engaged. For people outside my family, I sometimes send a card through the good old fashioned mail system for a bit of encouragement.

Elenore Doerksen, CCMBC communications team lead

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At Easter, Thanksgiving and Christmas, I bake something sweet for friends, but also for at least one person or family who wouldn’t be expecting it. Sometimes this is anonymous and
other times it’s a way of reaching out. And something trivial, but intentional: I try to make space for at least one vehicle to merge ahead of me during my commute to or from work.
—Audry Goertzen, CCMBC communications assistant

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Practising generosity takes practice. Supporting individuals like missionaries and church budget goals is a planned strategy. There are also non-monetary ways: listening in conversation, volunteering at an organization like the Gleaners and MCC.—Rudy Hiebert, submitted via Facebook

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Treat people with a generous spirit: think highly of others, give others the benefit of the doubt. This takes a certain level of humility on our part. For those closest to us, do the little things that give evidence to the fact we have the other person’s best interest in mind: opening the door, emptying the dishwasher, fixing clothes, making a favourite meal, being gracious with mistakes, holding our tongues, being appreciative.—Conrad Stoesz, CMBS archivist

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holly-4……………………… I often lend my arms to people who are moving. This is a great way to get to know people while helping them. I try to ask about their lives and to help assuage stress and concerns they have regarding their transition. On the flip side, I have been greatly blessed by receiving generosity. People have brought my family food while someone was sick, or after a loved one passed away. My stomach is a doorway to my heart (metaphorically speaking), so gifts of food are powerful expressions of love and compassion to me.

—Conrad Mann, summer student for CCMBC communications

   

 

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